Iderdown Interview on Nagamag

Categories: Electronica Features, Electronica Interviews, Features, Interviews, The Latest|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Nagamag:
Which are the genres that describe your music style better?

Iderdown:
I like to think of it as leftfield music, influenced by a wide array of genres. They all get blended together when I start writing, so any track at any time will be a mixture of noise, prog, post-rock, ambient, drone, glitch, trance, industrial and breakbeat.


Nagamag:
Few words about your musical background and career?

Iderdown:
Well, I was in an industrial band in high school and at the same time playing around with screamtracker. This was followed by some indie rock years in bands and toying with 4-track bedroom lo-fi songwriting. I started releasing my instrumental electronic music as iderdown in 2003 and continue to work on diverse projects like the dark folk band Within and playing as part of the drone collective Cosmic Homeostasis.


Nagamag:
Do you remember your first connection of love to music that was the right impact to be a music artist now?

Iderdown:
I have been making melodies in my head for long as I can remember and grew up in a house full of music but the first time I heard the songs that made me want to create was during high school, where I was lucky to have a group of friends who explored strange worlds of music.


Nagamag:
Tell me about your latest release?

Iderdown:
iderdown's last release was a collaboration ep with Arcane Trickster called Snowbird. It's an ambient soundtrack for a tranquil shore.


Nagamag:
What's coming up in the future for iderdown?

Iderdown:
A five track Lp of Ambient music that I wrote mostly inspired by the music of Peter Namlook. There will also be a companion set of remixes by Tempest Recording and Slice Records artists.


Nagamag:
Many artists listen to genres that they are not producing music for. Which track is your favorite that is NOT similar to yours?

Iderdown:
Japanese Breakfast "Posing In Bondage"


Nagamag:
Of Course Nagamag would love to listen also which is the track from a similar artist you admire?

Iderdown:
BVDUB "Never In The Prison Of Their Stars"

Discover & Listen to Iderdown

Iderdown on Spotify

Iderdown's Signature Track

Iderdown on Social Media

Iderdown
iderdown13

Iderdown's Website

www.iderdown.com/

Alberto Rizzo Schettino Interview on Nagamag

Categories: Features, Interviews, Neoclassical Features, Neoclassical Interviews, The Latest|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Nagamag:
What are the genres that describe better your music style?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
I write original music for film and video games. I play piano and keyboards and in the years I have gathered quite a collection of synthesizers, guitar amps and FX pedals. This definitely drives my music towards those instruments as I like to mix elements of electronic music (ambient, downtempo, glitch etc.) with more traditional orchestral instruments (strings, brass, percussion) and ethnic sounds from Africa and the Middle East. I try and mangle these original acoustic sounds from world music to be 'assimilated' by the machines, while still retaining their contrasting features. I try to maintain a delicate and constant fight between an industrial, cyberpunk and somehow dystopian sound palette and a more organic, classical setup with roaring strings and epic orchestral elements. I guess a lot of my work with techno artists and the club scene plays a role in what I imagine would be the sound of the streets and the underground in a distant future.


Nagamag:
Few words about your musical background and career?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
I've worked as a pianist/keyboardist for artists, bands and recording studios, mostly as a session musician. I've had my good share of live gigs in rock, acid jazz and fusion setups in which I would bring my keybards, guitar amps and guitar pedals and kinda force the stage to accept my sounds. I am not a fan of playing 'realistic instruments' live, and unfortunately you can achieve pretty good ones these days with keyboards.. but for me it's either acoustic piano, vintage keys or straight up synthesizers and mangled sounds. There's no in-between. In 2007 I opened my own recording studio, called 'Fuseroom' and I started producing records and keeping the facility open to music education programs. In the past years I went back to my role of composer and joined some game development companies (among which were some good friends of mine, from high school) to write original music for their video games. Getting back to writing music by myself was an adventure and somehow reconnected me with an artistic self that I had kept asleep for a while. It was a good time to get back at it and I was able to use this momentum to release a new solo record, called 'Future in the Past', highlighting some of the most iconic elements of my sound and songwriting, in the soundtrack genre.


Nagamag:
Do you remember your first connection of love to music that was the right impact to be a music artist now?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
As a kid I was lucky to have friends who one day told me on the phone: "We're making a band. What do you want to play?". It was that simple. We wanted to move from air guitars and air drums using broomsticks and empty soda bottles to playing for real. I looked around, I had a small digital keyboard I had been playing since I was in primary school and decided that I wanted to play piano and go to a real teacher. I started both classical and modern piano together and never stopped taking lessons from the day. At around 18 I felt like I had to choose and was captivated by modern music. I've played in pop/rock bands, jazz ensembles, small freestyle and acid jazz bands etc. especially when I moved my beautiful (but small) town of Firenze (Italy) to continue studying in Los Angeles. I cannot remember how many people I've played with and whose projects I joined. From there on I kept on studying, moving cities, attending to more music academies in the US and in Europe. If there was one constant that never left me is that I do not partake in projects that I do not like. I just cannot do it. I've studied to be a professional musician and I am happy to provide others with my expertise but I have to hear some kind of pulse in the project. Exposure, fame, money, you name it.. they just do not cut it in the end as I cannot go to sleep and look at myself in the mirror if I am doing something I do not genuinely and directly enjoy. I guess that spontaneous phone call from my friends when we were kids really left a mark.


Nagamag:
Is there a cliché or recurring pattern in the way you come up with a new piece of music?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
With the passing of time (and things become more recurring or fixed, with deadlines, revisions, team discussion, production supervisors and so on) I noticed that I start working on a song only after I can hear it in my head 'enough', over the course of a couple days. It is kinda funny to say that but once I receive the initial brief for a new music project and the team or production sends me guidelines for the vibe they are looking for, I do not sit at the instrument and try to put down ideas. I just let things breathe for a couple days and I start thinking about a tune. It might happen at the worst time or before falling asleep. If the idea is good, in a couple days I can always recall the main theme and at least the B-section that answers it. That is usually the right time for me to sit down, turn my computer on and start writing music.


Nagamag:
If you only had to keep one musical instrument, what would it be?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
This would be very challenging. I certainly consider the acoustic piano as my foundation but I have so many instruments that I like for their specific sound palette, some of which have almost healing properties when played, in my opinion. I would have a very hard time parting from my Voyager, Polysix, Juno-6 and Hammond, as well. Please do not make choose! ;)


Nagamag:
Most artists have a favorite song from a different music genre than the one they are producing music for... Which is yours?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
Andy Summers Mysterious Barricades


Nagamag:
Of Course Nagamag would love to listen also which track from a similar artist you admire?

Alberto Rizzo Schettino:
Ola Strandh Tom Clancy's The Division (Original Soundtrack)

Discover & Listen to Alberto Rizzo Schettino

Alberto Rizzo Schettino on Spotify

Alberto Rizzo Schettino's Signature Track

Alberto Rizzo Schettino on Social Media

albertorizzoschettino
alberto__rs

Alberto Rizzo Schettino's Website

www.albertorizzoschettino.net

Geist Contagion Interview on Nagamag

Categories: Electronica Features, Electronica Interviews, Features, Interviews, The Latest|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

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Nagamag:
What are the genres that describe better your music style?

Geist Contagion:
With my project Geist Contagion, I find myself with varied inspirations from one song to the next, so it becomes a bit of a daunting task to label each with its own discrete genre. There are elements of Glitchstep, Breakbeat, Techno, Industrial, Ambient, and Drone throughout my releases. I generally don't stick to one style for very long because I get bored easily, and I like to keep the listener on their toes.


Nagamag:
Few words about your musical background and career?

Geist Contagion:
I started out like a lot of people do, playing guitar in a garage band with my friends. *That eventually fizzled out, as it often tends to.* Shortly after, I attended school for artist management and music production, which is where I developed my love of synthesizers, and of a whole new world of musical styles and composition techniques. From there, I dove headfirst into experimental electronic music which lead to the formation of my main project, The Databats. I met the folks over at Slice Records around this time and after working together on a couple of gigs, they brought us into their stable of artists. Geist Contagion spawned from there as my first full solo project. I wanted an avenue for the music I was writing that didn't stylistically gel with my work with The Databats. This has allowed me to explore my songwriting ideas more deeply, and to illuminate music that otherwise wouldn't be making it out into the world at large.


Nagamag:
Do you remember your first connection of love to music that was the right impact to be a music artist now?

Geist Contagion:
I've felt a strong connection to music since I was very young. Some of my favourite parts of Saturday morning cartoons were the theme songs, not the cartoons themselves. As an adult, one of my more formative experiences was attending a live performance by Alessandro Cortini's solo project Sonoio, opening for Ladytron at The Phoenix in Toronto. Watching him utilize a myriad of synthesizers and vocal effects to craft such a layered and complex performance really opened my eyes to what was possible as a solo electronic performer, and to what an audience would be interested in experiencing.


Nagamag:
Tell us about your new album Écoutez and the process behind it.

Geist Contagion:
Écoutez is a collaborative album by Geist Contagion and Arcane Trickster. I met Damiano from Arcane Trickster a few years back when The Databats travelled to Australia and hooked up with the Slice Records crew for a couple of club gigs. We got along well and had a good rapport, so working together seemed like the logical next step.
Flash forward to 2020, and we found ourselves with a lot more time on our hands, so Damiano and I messaged back and forth a bit to discuss our ideas for a project. We then exchanged a bunch of demos via email, and once we decided on the tracks we wanted to use, we got down to editing, remixing and performing on one another's work. The ensuing result was a rather cohesive blend of each of our styles that we hope provides the audience with a fun journey from start to finish.

"Écoutez" means "listen" in French. It's both a title and an instruction. We'd like the audience to take a moment out of their hectic lives to do exactly that, just listen.


Nagamag:
What are the plans for Geist Contagion in 2021?

Geist Contagion:
I've been writing a lot of music, so hopefully we'll have followup to my record "Residue" out by the end of the year. On the collaborative front, there are a couple of projects going on at Slice Records that I plan to be very involved in, so you'll be hearing new remixes and joint productions from me as well. I'm very excited for those.
In terms of live performances, we're still under tight lockdown up here in Canada, so I've had to adapt. Thankfully, there are more ways than ever to reach out and interact with your audience, and I plan to take full advantage of those. Livestream performances, music videos, and interactive experiences are all part of the plan, so stay tuned for that! I'm also hoping I'll be able to get out and perform work by this project live some time before the end of the year, as I haven't had the opportunity to do that yet.


Nagamag:
Most artists have a favorite song from a different music genre than the one they are producing music for... Which is yours?

Geist Contagion:
Venetian Snares x Daniel Lanois "Night MXCMPV1 P74"


Nagamag:
Of Course Nagamag would love to listen also which track from a similar artist you admire?

Geist Contagion:
Oneohtrix Point Never "Nothing's Special"

Discover & Listen to Geist Contagion

Geist Contagion on Spotify

Geist Contagion's Signature Track

Geist Contagion on Social Media

@GeistContagion

Geist Contagion's Website

SliceRecords / Bandcamp / Ecoutez
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