Soto Interview on Nagamag.com

Soto
Interview

Soto Interview on Nagamag.com

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Nagamag:
What are the genres that describe better your music style?

Soto:
Jazz, R&B, Funk, Soul, Neo-Soul, Hip-hop. New to the UK Jazz scene, Soto is a trio born out of Brighton with a foot in the doors of Jazz, R&B, Funk & Soul. Blending intricate rhythms and unique melodies, their feel is both a tribute to the scene, and something new altogether.


Nagamag:
Few words about your musical background and career?

Soto:
Soto aim to make their audiences smile and groove with their work; something which undeniably helps this is the chemistry between the three founding members. Having all met in their first year at medical school, music was initially something of a side-hustle, but as the years passed it became more and more an integral to them as individuals and as a collective. Now, with their time at university drawing to a close, and a debut EP online, there'll be at least a few heads wondering what will be coming next from these guys.


Nagamag:
Do you remember your first connection of love to music that was the right impact to be a music artist now?

Soto:
The feeling that first connected each of us to music is re-experienced on a regular basis. There is a deeply moving experience that arises when hearing the work of artists that touch us, and this similarly is something that is felt when we connect musically as a collective or as individuals. Music is possibly the most significant bringer of joy in any of our lives, which is why we are so determined - even with careers as doctors ready to begin - to make this a central part of our future. A life without music would always feel empty in a way.


Nagamag:
What do YOU enjoy most about writing and playing your music?

Soto:
We are all genuinely dedicated to the musical journey that we're on together. There's nothing better than when we meet for band practice and one of us says 'I've been working on this recently - what do you think?' and plays something beautiful. Many of our songs have come from one person bringing an idea forward for us to jam with, or quite literally just appearing from jams. This makes the process of writing so fun, and something we always look forward to. Similarly, what could be more fun than bringing music into a live setting? We love to improvise and leave lots of room for our songs to be different each time they are played so we can fully express ourselves musically any time we meet - we think of music as a conversation between the three of us and any listeners that may be present.


Nagamag:
Where do you see yourselves going musically?

Soto:
We hope to continue to challenge ourselves. We are always trying to explore new themes, try new things and push each other more and more musically, and this is something we hope to keep going. What we aim to do is continue writing music and hopefully entertaining people with our work. We would love to carve our a career in music, and we are so driven to this that we hope we're fortunate enough to just get that break that we need to make this viable. Whatever happens though, we want to enjoy every step of the way and be present in this journey, wherever it may go.


Nagamag:
Music has no borders and many of us we may listen to more genres that we are mainly involved. So share with Nagamag which track comes first in your mind from music but is NOT similar to your genre?

Soto:
Celeste "Both Sides of The Moon"


Nagamag:
Of Course Nagamag would love to listen also which track from a similar artist you admire?

Soto:
Prime Panda "State Your Business"

Discover & Listen to Soto

Soto on Spotify

Soto's Signature Track

Soto on Social Media

SotoBrighton
sotogram
sototallysoto
2020-03-03T19:23:21+02:00Categories: Features, Interviews, The Latest|Tags: , , , , , , |

The Tristones – First World Problems (Spotify)

The Tristones – First World Problems
(Spotify)

The Tristones, led by the energetic and charismatic blues rocker Tristan Clark from New York, NY, today releases, “First World Problems,” the second single from his upcoming album Camaro, out in April. The track was written by Clark and his good friend Jordan Venn, a frequent collaborator. “We had the idea of writing a first person narrative on how easy it is to get annoyed about social media and other trivial day-to-day events, but all with a sense of humour,” says Clark. The playful, upbeat tune addresses the anxieties and restlessness caused by living in a digital world, presented in a rocking, tongue-in-cheek tone. “I’ve got first order problems / of the first world,” explains Clark in the song.

2020-02-16T23:55:58+02:00Categories: Audio, The Latest|Tags: , |

Anemoia – The Leak (Spotify)

Anemoia – The Leak (Spotify)
Spotify

Born from Improvisations of a trio in Dadeland area of Miami, FL. All vibe, groove, melody, and atmosphere.

2020-01-25T21:22:25+02:00Categories: Audio, The Latest|Tags: , , , |

Zenon Marko Interview on Nagamag.com

Zenon Marko
Interview

Zenon Marko Interview on Nagamag.com on Nagamag.com

Photo by Eva Mueller

Nagamag:
What are the genres that describe better your music style?

Zenon Marko:
Ambient, Neoclassical, Electronic, Downtempo, Electro-Acoustic, Traditional/”World”, Dub, Techno, House, Rock, Funk...

Nagamag:
Few words about your musical background and career?

Zenon Marko:
Music has always been a presence and love in my life. As a child, I studied piano and classical guitar, but drums soon became my primary instrument: acoustic drums, electronic drums, percussion. I became obsessed with the rhythms and sounds of drums. At the same time, I was also fascinated with the effects and possibilities of harmonies and timbre and texture and tonality, the “vertical” as well as “horizontal” axes of music. In my first university degree, I studied physics, but also studied music theory and composition; I continued on afterwards teaching myself more and more of these areas, along with production, engineering, sound design, synthesis, acoustics, psycho-acoustics, philosophy and aesthetics of music. I began a Ph.D. in physics, then switched tracks and instead completed a second undergraduate degree in philosophy. I am currently completing a Ph.D. in metaphilosophy, on the problem of beginning, or ultimate justification of knowledge. All along, I have been involved in music, as composer, producer, drummer, and DJ. As the list of genres suggests, my love of music embraces perhaps seemingly contradictory territories: from the most subtle ambient sound with no trace of rhythm, to extremely rhythmic music forms like dub, bossa, funk, techno, and rock. I have hundreds of musical works and ideas in various stages of completion, but perhaps it’s time to finally finish more of these and let them out into the wider world. There have been a number of releases with my on-going collaborative project Metasonica; I’ve just released my first solo album, the completely symmetrical instrumental ambient/neoclassical concept album “Symmetry”; there will be a rhythmic version of “Symmetry”, an entire video cycle related to the philosophy and concept, and live performances; there’s a completed ambient piano album to be released this year; I’m developing a dub techno project; also many tracks are already completed for a rhythmic downtempo project, featuring vocals in various different languages. Many more projects ongoing and in development, in and around my studio and production company, Disreality, here in downtown NYC.

Nagamag:
Do you remember your first connection of love to music that was the right impact to be a music artist now?

Zenon Marko:
Our family home was always full of music: piano, guitar, singing, records playing in every genre. However, my first distinct memory of experiencing music is that of hearing and seeing the Philadelphia Orchestra for the first time as a child. I was fortunate that my family introduced me to such experiences at an early age. I especially recall the overwhelming sense of awe and wonder at the beauty and power of this ensemble, in the grand space of the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, as the orchestra was tuning in preparation for the performance. Surely that sonic experience, of individual instruments beginning from a state of chaos and dissonance, gradually cohering into an immense and sublime coherence, has always remained with me as an ideal, not only of music, but of emotion, of something like (for lack of a better word) spirituality, and even of other-worldly perfection.

Nagamag:
Why do you create music?

Zenon Marko:
I often ask myself this question, actually. At times, from my more strictly rational, scientific, even somewhat brutally utilitarian, side, I question whether music, culture, art, and so on, are excessive luxuries and self-indulgences, in a world of so much suffering, of all creatures, human and non-human. This concern is magnified by my sense that the world is sliding towards some sort of apocalypse. Should I better apply my efforts elsewhere? Of course, I do work in philosophy as well, but one may raise similar doubts about the value of philosophy in the face of urgent practical crises. Should I only be working towards practical, measurable goals of world improvement, perhaps in a mode like effective altruism? Although these doubts never disappear, I do believe that our needs and aspirations go beyond the purely material, that one also needs what these cultural, aesthetic, intellectual, and spiritual activities provide. The material problems are urgent, of course, and demand our attention, as these address the functional basis for life; yet I believe these other regions of values, beliefs, and experiences are what render life beautiful and worthwhile. They offer a kind of transcendence. Certainly music has dramatically enriched my own life; it seems to offer a radically different kind of “answer”, compared to those offered by science and the more rational forms of philosophy; so how can I then deride it as a mere luxury or excess? After all, the music of others has given me so much. Therefore, my hope is that my music can give back in some way, and can bring to others, perhaps even to those in the depths of despair and suffering, some solace, beauty, and inspiration.

Nagamag:
Music has no borders and many of us we may listen to more genres that we are mainly involved. So share with Nagamag which track comes first in your mind from music but is NOT similar to your genre?

Zenon Marko:
Miles Davis “He Loved Him Madly”

Nagamag:
Of Course Nagamag would love to listen also which track from a similar artist you admire?

Zenon Marko:
Harold Budd & Brian Eno "First Light"

Discover & Listen to Zenon Marko

Zenon Marko on Spotify

Zenon Marko's Signature Track

Zenon Marko on Social Media

ZenonMarkoMusic
zenonmarko
zenonmarko

Zenon Marko's Website

www.zenonmarko.com